CEPI Now Accepting Applications for the Karabots Junior Fellows Program

Three students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program take part in a cow eye dissection.

Are you a Philly 9th grader with an interest in health care or medicine? If so, you might be perfect for the Karabots Junior Fellows Program! CEPI is now accepting applications for the Summer 2017 installment of the Karabots Junior Fellows Program. The Program seeks to cultivate the health care professionals of the future through hands-on learning and interaction with real professionals.

The next summer program will take place for two weeks, August 7-18, 2017, and consists of an intensive series of hands-on activities, meetings with healthcare professionals, and field trips focusing around a specific healthcare field. This year’s theme is Anatomy and Armor: exploring natural and artificial forms of protection against disease and trauma and learning about careers in healthcare and medicine related to those subjects.

Based on behavior, in-class participation and student interest, members of the two-week program may be asked to stay on for our multi-year after-school program focused on healthcare, STEM, and college preparation that goes through twelfth grade.

Students interested in joining the Karabots Junior Fellows Program must fulfill the following requirements to be considered:

  • Must be entering the 10th grade in Fall 2017.
  • Must be a Philadelphia resident.
  • Must be attending a Philadelphia public, parochial, or charter high school.
  • Must have an interest in biology and the healthcare professions.
  • Will be the first in their immediate family to graduate from a college or university.
  • Must qualify for a FREE or REDUCED PRICE school lunch.
  • Not have any disciplinary problems on their school record.
  • Must have permission from a parent/guardian to take part in the program.
  • If selected for this summer program, applicants must also be interested and available to participate in programming throughout the school year and summer through my senior year of high school if chosen to do so.

Interested students must complete an application form, including an essay and letter of recommendation. (Full instructions are available on the application). Completed applications can be submitted via email (subject heading: Karabots Junior Fellows Application) or standard mail to the following address:

Attn: Kevin D. Impellizeri (Karabots Junior Fellows)
The College of Physicians of Philadelphia
19 South 22nd Street
Philadelphia, PA 19103

The deadline to apply is FRIDAY, APRIL 28, 2017 (all mailed applicants must be postmarked by that date to be considered). If you have any questions, please contact Kevin Impellizeri, Youth Program Coordinator (215-372-7313). For more information about the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, please consult our website.

The Karabots Junior Fellows Learn to Make a Good Impression

Jon Goff, Associate Director of Fellow Ship Relations for the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, conducts a mock job interview with Quran, a student in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program. The two are seated opposite each other (Goff in the center, and Quran to the left). Several other students are seated in the foreground and background.

As part of the curriculum for the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, we are dedicated to helping our students prepare for their future careers, regardless of whether they ultimately find themselves in medical/heathcare fields. To that end, we recently held a session devoted to professionalism.

The Fellows learned the importance of carrying oneself in a professional manner both in their in-person and virtual interactions. Kevin went over some tips to a high-quality résumé and the art of constructing a professionally-worded email. Guest speaker Jon Goff, Associate Director of Fellowship Relations for the College of Physicians of Philadelphia as well as a former CEPI educator, gave them tips on the interview process by conducting one-on-one mock interviews (complete with common interview questions) with several of the students. Jeanene talked about the importance of body language and how people (including potential employers) measure a person’s engagement based on their physical behavior. Observing graduate students from Drexel University were also o hand to share their experiences with the job hunt.

Jon Goff, Associate Director of Fellow Ship Relations for the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, conducts a mock job interview with Viviana, a student in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program. The two are seated opposite each other (Goff to the left, Viviana to the right). Several other students are seated in the foreground and background.

The Karabots Fellows Enter the Dragons’ Lair

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program talk with Michael Rankin, director of strength and conditioning at Drexel University. They stand in the midst of various exercise equipment (a treadmill is in the center frame).

Earlier this month the students of the Karabots Junior Fellows Program received a hands-on look at some exciting careers in sports medicine, courtesy of Drexel University’s Athletic Program.

On February 11, the Fellows traveled to the Daskalakis Athletic Center (aka “the DAC”) where they met with some health care professionals involved in Drexel sports. Michael Rankin, Drexel’s Director of Strength and Conditioning, led them through workout facilities and explained how he helps athletes prepare their bodies for competition. Next, Andrea Irvine, the Dragons’ Sports Dietitian, talked about the science and career potential surrounding sports nutrition. Afterwards, The Fellows received a tour of Drexel’s athletics facilities followed by a trip to see the Drexel men’s basketball team take on the Towson Tigers. While Drexel ultimately lost to Towson (69-65), the Fellows gained valuable experience and fresh perspective on sports medicine.

The basketball court at the Daskalakis Athletic Center prior to the Drexel men's basketball game against Towson on February 11.

 

Philly Youth Kick Off Pennsylvania Teen Health Week 2017

Students from CEPI's various youth programs pose for a group photo on the steps of the PA State House with Dr. Rachel Levine and Dr. Loren Robinson

Did you know that teenagers make up 13% of the total US population? However, despite making up such a significant portion of the population there was no week focusing on teen health until 2016. In January 2016, Pennsylvania became the first state to devote a week to spreading awareness about the health issues directly affecting teenagers with the creation of Pennsylvania Teen Health Week (THW). Teen Health Week was the brainchild of Dr. Laura Offutt. Dr. Offutt is a Pennsylvania physician, Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia, and the host of Real Talk with Dr. Offutt, an online resource devoted to teen health. CEPI is proud to be an active partner in Pennsylvania Teen Health Week. January 9-13 is the observance Pennsylvania Teen Health Week 2017. This year each day focuses on one of five themes: Nutrition and Fitness, Violence Prevention, Mental Health, Sexual Health, and Substance Use.

Teva intern Su Ly stands at a podium in front of attendees to the proclamation of Pennsylvania Teen Health Week 2017 at the Pennsylvania State House

This past Monday we traveled to the Pennsylvania State House in Harrisburg to commemorate the second annual Pennsylvania Teen Health Week. Philadelphia youth representing the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program, and the Out4STEM Program were on site to show their support. The festivities began with statements from four prominent Pennsylvania physicians: Dr. Rachel Levine, Physician General for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania; Dr. Loren Robinson, Deputy Secretary for Health Promotion and Disease Prevention for the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania (and Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia), Dr. Robert Sharrar, Executive Director of Safety, Epidemiology, Registries and Risk Management and Member of the Philadelphia Board of Health (as well as a Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia), and Dr. Offutt. The event concluded with a reading of Gov. Tom Wolf’s proclamation announcing January 9-13 as Pennsylvania Teen Health Week 2017. Several Philadelphia youth, including Xavier Gavin and Su Ly of the Karabots and Teva Program, respectively, bravely read Gov. Wolf’s proclamation.

Students from CEPI's various youth programs sit in the observation deck atop the Pennsylvania State Senate chamber and listen to a guide conduct a tour of the State House

After the reading, our students took a tour of the Pennsylvania State House, visiting the chambers of the Pennsylvania Senate, House of Representatives, and Supreme Court. While they viewed from the observation decks of the respective government houses, we hope to see some of them as lawmakers and policy developers in the future (remember: the minimum age to serve in the Pennsylvania House of Representatives is 21).

Image displaying the logos of the sponsors for Teen Health Week: Pennsylvania Southeast Region Area Health Education Center (AHEC); System of Care, a program of the Delaware County Department of Human Services; the Craig Dalsimer Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children's Hospital of Philadelphia; and Honeygrow.

Pennsylvania Teen Health Week 2017 is sponsored in part by the Pennsylvania Southeast Region Area Health Education Center (AHEC)System of Care, a program of the Delaware County Department of Human Services; the Craig Dalsimer Division of Adolescent Medicine, Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia; and Honeygrow.

CEPI Youth Help People Get Tested at World AIDS Day 2016

Four students in the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship pose with signs displaying various facts about HIV/AIDS at World AIDS Day 2016

On December 3, the College of Physicians of Philadelphia observed World AIDS Day 2016 with a day-long event to promote HIV/AIDS awareness, dispel the stigma and misconceptions associated with the disease, and encourage people to get tested. Visitors to the Mütter Museum received free admission in exchange for an HIV test (they involve a simple blood sample and test results are known in 60 seconds, a small price to pay for a day at the Museum and certainty over one’s status). It was a large undertaking; fortunately we had on hand a dedicated group of CEPI youth to help out.

Representing the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, the Teva Pharmaceuticals Internship Program, and the Out4STEM Program, our intrepid volunteers were instrumental in logistics, education, and promotion. They directed visitors who came to get tested to make sure the process was as quick and easy as possible. They encouraged people to pose with images of HIV/AIDS-related facts and share them on social media. They also helped educate the public with small health-related lessons, including a lesson on bone pathology using models of human skulls. Overall they helped make for a successful event wherein we tested eighty-five people!

Sara, a student in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, teaches two students about skull pathology by displaying a group of human skull replicas at World AIDS Day 2016

 

The Karabots Junior Fellows Journey Through the Academy of Natural Sciences

Timshel Purdum, Assistant VP of Public Experience at the Academy of Natural Sciences, presents a tour of an animal display to the Karabots Junior Fellows

As part of their year-long study of the medical and social construction of the body, the students of the Karabots Junior Fellows Program are preparing to develop their own exhibit. To help them better prepare and to understand how museums use human and animal specimens to teach the public, they recently visited the Academy of Natural Sciences to explore their animal displays. Founded in 1812, the Academy of Natural Sciences of Philadelphia seeks to educate the public in subjects related to natural history. They feature an impressive collection of flora and fauna specimens, including prehistoric skeletons, a live butterfly room, and taxidermy displays of various species that recreate them in their natural habitats (known as “habitat dioramas”). Timshel Purdum, Assistant Vice President for Public Experience, led the Fellows on a tour of the habitat dioramas, explaining the process by which the specimens were acquired, how they were prepared for display, and how the Academy uses them to educate the public. She also presented the students with fascinating inside stories about various dioramas (such as the “Franken-moose,” a moose specimen with the antlers of a different moose attached to them) and images from the site’s copious historical records. Afterwards the explored the museum for themselves.

Photograph of the "Franken-Moose," a moose with another moose's antlers on display at the Academy of Natural Sciences

The Karabots Fellows Observe Wildlife at the Wagner

Students in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program pose in front of a skeleton of a draught horse on display at the Wagner Free Institute of Science

Throughout this semester, the Karabots Junior Fellows have been focusing on the medical and social construction of human bodies. Recently, they expanded their knowledge to include how museums display animal bodies. In the first of two field trips on this topic, the Fellows visited the Wagner Free Institute of Science to explore their vast collection of natural history specimens. The Institute had its origins as an educational lecture series run by William Wagner (1796-1885), a Philadelphia merchant and amateur scientist. In 1855, local merchant and amateur scientist William Wagner (1796-1885) incorporated the Institute as a place to educate the public on the natural sciences, utilizing educators and his eclectic collection of wildlife specimens. Today the Institute’s natural history museum houses over 10,000 specimens, including fossils, skeletons, and taxidermy animals, many of which are on display to the public in nineteenth century artifact cases not unlike the Mütter Museum (which opened its doors around the same time as the Wagner). Both the College of Physicians of Philadelphia and the Wagner Free Institute of Science share a common figure in Joseph Leidy. Leidy, a pioneer of microscopy, a scholar of comparative anatomy, and a Fellow of the College of Physicians of Philadelphia (among other things) succeeded Wagner as Director of the Institute following his death in 1885.

After a brief introduction from Wagner Museum Educator Annie Zhang, the Fellows were tasked with identifying a specimen they found interesting and to make a sketch of it. At the end of our visit, the Fellows shared their selections and showed off their artistic skills. To commemorate their visit, the students took part in the “Mannequin Challenge,” a trend where people freeze in stationary poses while someone films them to the tune of “Black Beatles” by Rae Sremmurd, gathering around the Institute’s impressive skeleton of a 19th century English draught horse.

Vashon, a student in the Karabots Junior Fellows Program, sketches a flying fox bat specimen on display at the Wagner Free Institute of Science